Gift #770: Southwest landscape

Today I wanted to share some more pictures of the mountains of New Mexico.  Being from Colorado, I was excited to visit mountains again.  These were not the conifer and aspen forested granite slopes of the Rockies, but they were beautiful in their own way.  The Sangre de Cristo mountain range are covered with scrub and sage and are more earthy than rocky, if that makes sense.  When we went for our petroglyph hike, I tried to take some close-ups of the foliage.  The dried winter foliage and seed heads were lovely.

image image

We went further up the mountain to visit a group of big horn sheep.  That was neat to see them roaming about on the side of the mountain.  Then the tour guide took us to an off-grid neighborhood at the top of the mountain called Earthships.  The residents construct trendy homes made up recycled rubber, adobe, and glass and raise food crops in greenhouses.

image

The word that came to mind was “bower-bird”.  These are birds which decorate their nests and the area around it with sticks, stones, and brightly colored bits and pieces they find.  Up on the mesa there’s not much growing except some grasses, but the view is extraordinary with higher snow-covered peaks in the distance.

image

One of the ways that these mountains did resemble my beloved Rockies was in the little mountain rivers that dotted the landscape.  This river kept us company as we entered and exited the mountain pass leading into Taos.

image

The Rio de Pueblo, or Red Willow Creek, runs through the Pueblo reservation from its headwaters in a mountain lake.  It gets its name from the red willow rushes that grow along the bank.  These are harvested and woven into baskets.

image

The natural landscape of Taos has inspired artists for well over a hundred years.  Looking at the mountains, expansive mesas, and bright blue sky – it’s no wonder why it continues to draw seekers of beauty.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s