Gift #1099: Flying Away

I’m settled in the airport awaiting the flight that will bring me home to my mountains for a few days.  At my gate is a beautiful art installation on the window of birds flying into the deep blue sky and this poem.

For now you are flying over quarry lakes, green water where stone was once cut for the Empire State, the nation’s capital, buildings all over the world

Aspiring toward sky deep and blue, as you head away or back, thinking of the people below living their lives above bedrock formed from the silt of ancient seas, on prairie plowed flat by glacial ice

and though you are of that swirling earth below, for these few moments you float with some small time away from the matters you’re going to and the places you’ve left behind. 

I’m looking forward to the week and of course I have knitting in hand.  I’ll try to blog about my adventures if I can, but  most of my posting will be done on Instagram because it’s easier to use when traveling.  Feel free to join me there and follow me, seraines317.  Until next time….

blessings to you,

Sarah

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Gift #1098: More Garden Delights

Since it’s summer time and the gardens are in high bloom, today we have more floral pictures.  I’m not particularly a fan of summer, so it’s main redeeming perk is that summer is filled with flowers and they are a delight to behold.  Here are more pictures from the Betty Ford Alpine Garden.  Last time I posted on the high-altitude paradise, I showed some floral vignettes I’d taken throughout the garden.  Did you notice they were all purple/blue flowers?  Well, I might have led you to believe the garden designers were as OCD as I am and actually planted monochromatic hued gardens so that everything would match.  Realizing that might give rise to an improper view of the garden, I thought maybe I should show evidence of a range of colors.  So here are more flowers from the garden – not in purples (which is apparently my favorite color right now).

 Pink lupine grows attractively against a backdrop of pine, and reminds me of my beloved montane forest.

 I’m not quite sure what this is – I think I looked it up and forgot.  But I love the frilly texture of the petals and the growth habit of this beautiful wildflower.

Now, to one of my favorites –  I love poppies!  As with orchids, this is one I had to work on appreciating ( I think some Wizard of Oz phobia played into my initial dislike).  But I adore poppies, especially since coming to find they come in other colors besides red.  The yellow and pale peach colors are my favorites.

I was surprised to see them in bloom – typically they are a mid/late summer flower in Denver and it was still quite cool in the mountains when I was here.  But as the afternoon sun crested, I came upon this garden bed edged in fully-opened pristine poppies.  The sun made them glisten like translucent jewels and I was utterly entranced.  They must have just bloomed too because their petals were perfect.  It was one of my happiest memories in the garden.

So there you have it!   Some more lovelies from the garden, and none of them were purple! In truth though, these were all the non-purple photos I found I’d taken, and I still have lots of purple wildflower pics I haven’t shared.  That poppy though – isn’t she amazing?!  Every flower is an ordinary miracle and I hope your day is filled with them.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1097: Garden Whimsy

Hello again!  I’m hoping by August to become a bit more consistent with my blog posts.  There’s not much hope for the rest of July though.  I’ve been thinking about what to write for the next post and had been tossing around several ideas.  And then I read a passage in my book at lunch and I knew I had to include it in my next blog.  I am reading Orchid – A Cultural History, by Jim Endersby of Kew Botanic Gardens.  It’s a journey through time, culture, and science about orchids.  It is the second of three books I received for my birthday about orchids.  Remember earlier in the year when I said I’d finally made the transition and started loving orchids?  Well, I’ve been reading about them ever since.  The first book I read was Orchid Fever by Eric Hansen and it was one of the best books I’ve read in a long time.  The author has a mischievous engaging style of writing and is blessed with the ability to phrase complex ideas succinctly and simply.  Plus the personalities and situations he described as people go to all lengths to collect and care for their beloved orchids makes for great reading.

But back to my current book.  Being by a Kew botanist, it is a bit more scholarly in tone and subject matter.  I’m now reading about the Victorian craze for orchids that put all of Europe in an uproar.  It was also a fascinating time because botany was a popular interest and many periodicals, papers, and books were focused on bringing plant biology and gardening to the masses.  Public nurseries were established as the number of species exported from all over the world funneled into England.  Orchids were touted as a practical plant with a touch of aristocracy about them because they were a reliable and long-lasting flower.  An owner’s growing manual had the following to say in praise of orchids:

“An orchid-flower means what it says.  It does not fall to pieces like a lily; there is no shedding of petals; no dropping away from the peduncle; no self-decapitation, like that of a fuchsia; no collapsing and dissolving, like a spiderwort; – no, there is never any of this; the orchid-flower is neither superficial, nor fugitive, nor insincere…. If we mistake not, orchid-flowers have a grand future before them.” 

That paragraph just made me giggle.  I love the way Victorians were not afraid to anthropomorphize plants and animals and imbue them with personalities.  Orchids were stout, reliable, sturdy plants – remarkably like the British themselves.  The description is ideal to be sure, and almost absurd given that at the time, most botanists were still working out how to grow the myriad orchid species coming in from tropics around the world.  Many years of patient effort were required to get some species to flower.

The unexpected bit of whimsy in my book reminded me of a recent trip to the White River Gardens.  I hadn’t been there in a long time and decided to visit a couple of weekends ago. It’s not nearly as large as my Botanic Gardens in Denver, but it has several pleasant stroll through shade, sun, water, and meditation gardens.  It’s strong point however are the sweet touches of playful statues scattered throughout the gardens.

For example, there’s the forgetful turtle, who’s quite sure he had something important in his hand a few minutes ago… if only he could remember what it was and where he put it.  Perhaps he should ask a more observant neighbor.

But Mr. Squirrel is far too enamored of his love, the acorn, to take notice of anyone else.  Just look at that gaze of utter adoration.  Sigh… to be an acorn in the arms of an amorous squirrel…  and in a garden too!

And here’s a self-satisfied sort.  Mr. Rabbit lives in the back of the garden, conveniently near the vegetable patch.  You can see he’s helped himself to some of the gardener’s bounty and is congratulating himself on his fine catch.  They’ll be no living with him after this – you can be sure he’ll be bragging about his skills to any unfortunate passerby that gets tangled in conversation.

Mr. Frog however is a thoughtful soul, given to quietness and introspection, and not likely to venture beyond his lily pad.  Here he finds more than enough to ponder – why both the sky and water are blue, who tells the lily blossoms when to open and close each day, how the dragonfly dances on the water, and when will the fireflies sprinkle magic in the twilight.

Oh good, it seems Mr. Turtle has found his misplaced treasure.  It appears to be a lovely Allium flower.  And he’s invited all the other turtles to a dance to celebrate!  Spying on a turtle dance is a rare treat – they clap and whirl and twirl to riotous music from the tree frogs.  How fortunate we were able to visit the neighborhood today!

I hope you enjoyed the tour through the garden and may you find magic in the ordinary miracles today.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gift #1096: Liberty Tree

I’m sitting quietly in my living room, listening to the booming and popping of firecrackers going off all around.  The lightning bugs are putting on their own show in the backyard forest and I must say they are more beautiful and enchanting than any man-made firecracker.  The past couple of July 4th’s have been spent in Colorado, and it feels a little strange to be at home on this day.   I wasn’t planning on having an Independence Day post, but earlier this evening I watched Johnny Tremain (the 1957 Disney live-action).  As the characters return from dumping the tea in the Boston Harbor, they sing a song (because it’s a Disney movie) called the Liberty Tree.   This is actually the first American/patriotic song I can remember.  It was on a record (yes, a record) my family had when I was very little called “Yankee Doodle Mickey”.  Liberty Tree was my favorite.  Since it’s a rather obscure song, I thought I’d post the lyrics here in honor of July 4th.  If you’d like to hear the song, I noticed there are several youtube clips of the scene from the movie.  And I recommend the movie too – it’s a noble look at the early events that spurred the colonies to independence and it includes a brilliant address on when and why we fight for freedom.

Plant the seed in our homeland, boys. Let it grow where all can see.
Feed it with our devotion, boys. Call it the Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

Save it from the storm, boys. Water down its roots with tea.
And the sun will always shine on the ole’ Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

March along with the piper, boys. We were born forever free.
Let’s go pay the piper, boys, beneath the Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

Pay the price they’re asking, boys. Always pay the tyrant’s fee.
Never give up the struggle, boys. Fight for the Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

Stand for the rights of man, boys. Stand against all tyranny.
Hang the lamps of freedom, boys, high on the Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

N’ it will grow as we grow, boys. It will be as strong as we.
We must cling to our faith, boys – faith in the Liberty Tree.

It’s a tall old Tree
And a strong old Tree
And we are the Sons
Yes, we are the Sons
The Sons of Liberty.

We are gifted with an incredible heritage.  Our country’s origins are unique in that at our foundation is the belief in the inherent right of liberty and justice for all.  It’s an ideal that is not fully realized and never has been.  Indeed, our entire history as a nation has been one of grappling with the disconnect between this vision of righteousness and the reality of a broken world.  On our own, we can’t achieve it, but a rule of absolute justice, righteousness, and mercy is coming.  The ideals we struggle to realize now will be reality when God’s kingdom comes and His will is done on earth and in heaven.  Until then, our call  is to enter the struggle: to fight for righteousness, for justice, for an end to tyranny, to free the oppressed, and lift up the sorrowful.   This is the legacy and the charge to all who would be sons of liberty.

Image result for liberty tree

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1095: In bloom

In the last post, I showed you pictures of the Alpine Gardens at Vail.  Today, I’d like to highlight some of the individual plants.  I took lots of pictures and want to keep sharing them with you.  And it’s nice to relive the experience through going through the photos again.

Gardens are in peak form during June in Colorado and I’m grateful to be able to coordinate my visits when so many flowers grace the gardens.  Lupines in particular where stunning and thrive in the hot, sunny places that the exposed rock gardens provide.

Allium is a favorite of mine – I love the starburst look of the blooms.  Although it’s hard to see in this photo, the center of each blossom was bright green and the combination with purple petals was quite striking.

Mountain coneflowers were in abundance.  I love their side profiles.  The petals look like they’re coming out of an artichoke.  The petals are jagged and spiky and very interesting to look at.

I’m not sure what this beauty is called.  The most similar flower I could find is called monk’s hood.  It was too stunning to leave out, even if I don’t know it’s correct name.  If anyone does know, please leave a comment introducing me to it.

And of course, the beautiful columbine.  I’m very grateful that these grow well in Indiana too and they are generously represented in my garden beds as a way to tie both my homes together.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1094: Alpine Gardens

I do hope you will excuse my absence on the blog front recently.  Life got busy, I got tired, and then I was out of town for a while on a business conference.   I was able to return to my heart-home – Colorado.  The conference was at Keystone Colorado, a lovely 9000+ feet above sea level and home to a host of pine trees, granite outcroppings, blue skies, wildflowers, and abundant sunshine.  I was beyond happy to be back home again in my mountains.  Everything else about the trip was icing on the cake.  The conference was good and the hotel luxurious, but even during all the talks and symposiums, my mind was fixated on one thought:  “my mountains are right outside this door”!

Now, this series of conferences is unique in that we have the afternoons off.  They are held in skiing communities, typically in the winter, so that attendees can enjoy skiing.  But a few are hosted during summer months, and that’s the one I’ve gone to for two years now.  This time, I was travelling on my own (not with coworkers) and I rented a car to do some things in the area that I hadn’t had a chance to do since I lived there with my family.

image

One of those activities on my to-do list was to visit Vail.  When I lived there, my family took a fall trip there and visited the town and a garden.  I remember a world of boulders and waterfalls nestled in the arms of aspens glowing with fall color.  It is the Betty Ford Alpine Garden and is the world’s highest alpine garden, clocking in at 8200 feet above sea level.

While living in Colorado, I learned to love alpine gardens deeply.  They are one of my very favorite types of gardens and I was anxious to see these and compare them to the alpine gardens at Denver Botanic Gardens.  The important features of an alpine rock garden are thus:  1) rocks – you must have large granite boulders strung about the garden in a haphazard manner (actually it’s quite precise, but meant to look random and natural).  These must be heaped up on each other or otherwise look like they’ve tumbled down the mountain and they provide wonderful nooks and crannies for plants to grow.

image

Which brings me to 2) plants specialized to live in low moisture, high extreme environments.  It’s surprising the variety of plants that can grow here.  There are columbines, lupines, and grasses that gently blow in the wind.  And then there are tiny dome-shaped plants like alpine clover that are a mass of little leaves and pink flowers that form a mat over their shallow root system and protect the roots from frost damage.  One of the interesting adaptations of alpine plants are their roots.  The plants that grow together have differing lengths of roots – from very shallow to over 3 feet deep.  this allows them to specialize by extracting nutrients from the soils at different depths, and it also allows for different plant growth habits.  Those plants with deep roots can grow taller and those with shallow systems typically are ground-cover plants.

image

Other ingredients for a proper rock garden include 3) succulents – you really can’t have a decent garden full of rocks and not have hens and chicks growing all over the crevices and edges of the rocks.  There were a variety of succulents growing along the trails and rock walls and in the boulders.  Like in desert environments, water is scarce and many alpine plants are succulents and store the water in their leaves.  Really good alpine gardens will also feature pine cones along with their succulents.  Well done!

image

4) Lichen – in addition to being incredibly beautiful, they are an interesting example of symbiosis.  Lichens drape across the surface of rocks much like doilies drape antique furniture.  In a range of yellow, to green, to brown, these tiny organisms create a dazzling display of color and texture over the boulders.  They are a unique combination of algae and fungi that coexist together, where neither could survive alone.  The algae photosynthesize and provide energy source and the fungi extract required minerals from the soil.

5) Water – preferably a waterfall or stream or both.  Although most alpine gardens are specialized to survive low water, most will have a “wet” season in summer from some snowmelt.  All throughout my drive in the mountains I saw spontaneous waterfalls where snow-melt rivers were filled to the brim and spilled out on the rocks below.  This garden mimicked the mountains in early summer with a series of waterfalls down the mountain, ending in a meandering river banked up with wildflowers and aspens.

image

An added plus to any alpine garden are benches to sit and admire the beauty while knitting.

image

Visiting this garden was such a delight.  It was created and maintained by a team of volunteers from the city and it’s a beautiful legacy of love in the mountains of Colorado.

image

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1093: Fiber Festivals

During the warm weather months you may not think that knitting would be on the top of anyone’s mind, but I assure you that it is.  Spring and summer are hosts to various fiber festivals throughout our area and I love attending.  Local dyers, spinners, weavers come to share their beautiful yarns and fibers with us.  If we’re really lucky, local farmers will bring out some of their alpacas, sheep, and angora rabbits and we can pet the animals!  This year I was fortunate enough to attend 2 fiber events.  I always go to the Greencastle fest in April.  We’ve been during snow, rain, or 80 degree heat.  (April is a variable month in the Midwest).  I’ve been attending this show for several years and by now am friendly with my favorite vendors.  I look forward to visiting with them again and also seeing their beautiful yarns.

I’ve discovered the collage option on Instagram and thought this was a good way to share the shows with you without having to post 12 pics.  Here’s a snapshot of some of wonderful sights from the show.  These festivals are so inspiring because you see so many beautiful yarns and projects to knit with them.  It’s certainly intoxicating.

Just last weekend, my mom and I went to Hoosier Hills Fiber Festival.  We’d been once before but were not as impressed as with Greencastle and hadn’t been back in a few years.  Since several vendors we knew were going to be there this year, we decided to give it another go.  And I’m so glad we did!  We had a wonderful time, found some beautiful yarns, and I’m still on a “yarn high” about the whole experience!

One of the big surprises was the photo above.  One of the companies I knew from online, Twisted Fibers, had a booth – they are very special in the yarn industry because they dye their yarn so that the whole skein is a gradient of color.  And it makes spectacular projects.  I’ve long admired their yarn, but have never bought any or seen it in person.  I literally couldn’t breathe or speak for a few minutes in surprise.  And at that moment, the resolve about visiting all the vendors before spending money evaporated and I made a purchase – the green/purple skein pictured in the shawl on the upper right.

As I mentioned, it’s very exciting to see knitted shawls and garments and hats and gloves every which way you look.  One vendor in particular has a slam-dunk selection of knitted lace shawls to show off her yarns and I took pictures of several so I could remember the projects for later.  I can’t tell you how many times all it’s taken is a look at such a shawl to make me purchase the yarn and pattern on the spot.  Sigh.

So here’s a look now at some of the yarns that came home from these events.

These were the Greencastle yarns that I purchased.  From top left, these 3 hand-dyed skeins from Good Yarns blend from dark brown to pale pink/coffee/cream and I plan to use these for a gradient project which are really popular in the knitting community right now.  The top left skeins are from a favorite vendor, Yarn Daze, that do some remarkable dyeing.  Their skeins are rich with natural colors and have a complex dyeing to them that leaves one mesmerized and completely defenseless against their wiles.  These skeins melt from green/gold to rust/brown and, quite frankly, I just want to look at them.  I’m not sure what they’ll become yet – if I want to use them together or separate – but regardless of what they’ll be knitted into, I’ll look like I’m wearing a forest.  And that makes me very happy.  The bottom two photos are yarn that I purchased from Deep Dyed Yarn, formerly LunaBud.  I love this dyer so much.  She’s very sweet, interesting to talk to, and we’ve got a good relationship.  I’ve found a couple of patterns already that I’d like to make with these beauties.

From Hoosier Hills, here are my yarny treasures.  Up left was my non-yarn purchase, some leaf trays handmade by a local potter.  He impresses them with leaves from his yard and the bottom has a beautiful lacy texture from his mother-in-law’s doilies.  The potter was a fascinating person to talk to and so kind – he invited my mom and I to his studio and gave us a brochure with class info.  A secret desire of mine has always been to make pottery, so that is very tempting.  We’ll see how long I can hold out on that one.  I really don’t need another hobby.  These two leaves will decorate my room.  My mom bought a green set.  Middle left are some more yarns from Deep Dyed Yarns.  She had a blue mini-skein set this time and I also procured a full skein of white, blue, grey, teal colors.  On the bottom left are three skeins from Knitting Notions.  The middle and right will definitely be combined for a shawl – I have several options for a pattern.  The orange skein on the left can’t decide if it wants to throw in her lot with the other two or stand alone on her own.  Decisions, decisions…  Bottom right are the two skeins from Twisted Fiber – the green/purple is called Wilderness.  The other skein is cream, yellow, pink, purple.  It instantly reminded me of an orchid (they are a current interest of mine) and I bought a pattern reminiscent of orchid petals.  And the skeins on the upper right are the spontaneous purchase.  I was in the booth (it was actually a trailer full of yarn!) looking around and my hands just sorted through skeins and pulled these matching ones out of a couple of bins.  It happened before I even knew what was going on.  And then there were these three fetching skeins ranging from brown to yellow to orange and pink.  Gasp..  They were made for the “Free your Fade” shawl that just released.

And that my friends will have to conclude the majority of yarn purchases for the year and will undoubtedly keep me busy for quite some time.  Next posting, I’ll show you the projects I’ve completed recently and yep, I’m ready to cast on some more.

Until then, have a happy weekend.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1092: Walking through time

Today I thought I’d share some photos from my favorite trail in Indiana.  This is always the first hike my mom and I do when we arrive at Spring Mill.  It’s a short jaunt down the hill from the lodge, a meander by the creek, a hop across the creek, and then a leisurely stroll down river takes you to the Wilson monument and the Hamer cave.

image

Here’s a view across the lake.  It was placid when we hiked by that evening and birds were settling in for the night in the trees overhanging the lake.  You can see the stone bridge across the lake in the photo if you squint.

image

image

This time of year the forest was rich in emerald hues and wildflowers still dotted the undergrowth, if you could spot them through the green.  We were fortunate enough to spy this jack-in-the-pulpit still in its prime.

image

After trailing along the river bed for a while, the path takes you by the Wilson Monument.  This is one of the greatest treasures in the park.  The man who owned the property, George Donaldson, erected this as a  tribute to his fellow Scotsman and ornithologist, Alexander Wilson.

image

It’s weathered and aged now and even in the years since we’ve been going to the park, I’ve noticed the details on the engraving are being lost to time.  But that, in its way, makes it even more beautiful.  In the Audubon exhibit at our art museum, we learned that Audubon met Wilson and had studied his work.  He did not hold the Scottish ornithologist in high regard though, claiming his artwork was superior and his observations keener.   I find that hard to believe as Wilson was a dedicated natural historian with a fine eye for detail and artistry in his illustrations.  We were able to see Audubon’s copy of Wilson’s ornithology volume at the exhibit, and this might have been my favorite exhibit.

Growing within the enclosure of the monument was this little beauty.

image

Behind the monument, the creek flowed along lazily and mist was rising from the water.  It was hazy in the sunset and cool.  It felt like the centuries shifted in the breeze and flickered between our time and his.  In the twilight, shadows took form and the greens deepened, and I drank in the smell of ancient waters and moist soil and old wood.  I understood afresh the fierce love that indigenous peoples and settlers shared for this land and in that moment I felt I was one of them too.

image

Blessings to you,

Sarah

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Gift #1091: May Art Bead Scene Challenge

May’s Art Bead Scene challenge was a piece by Picasso entitled “Bowl of Fruit, Violin, and Bottle” painted in 1914.

Picasso’s work has always seemed to me something of a “Where’s Waldo?” experience.  When I look at this, I see an untidy stack of papers and envelopes – nothing at all like what he had actually painted.  With some effort I can make out dissected parts of a violin.  I’ve yet to find the bowl of fruit or the bottle.  Anyone see the bottle??  The blog post introducing the work described the cubism of Picasso as a departure from a traditional depiction of an item in favor of a fractured image seen from different angles – somewhat like what you would see if you looked at an object via funhouse mirror sets.  It’s a creative idea, though my brain is not wired to accept and understand such manipulations.  I think his style is useful in provoking discussions about what is ultimately the purpose of art – the idea that the artist is trying to communicate, or how the audience chooses to interpret the art… and what happens when the two are divergent?  Is the artist’s conception or the audience’s perception more important?  I think the power of art is in driving these sorts of discussions.  It creates a conversation across time, an exchange of ideas that enlightens and broadens one’s experience.

Such were the thoughts running through my head as I grappled with how to interpret this artwork into jewelry.  I loved the color palette, but my initial ideas on subject matter were a bit vague as I tried to decide whether to design based on what I saw when I looked at the painting or what Picasso had in mind.  Then my favorite bead designer, Humblebeads, entered the picture with a whole passel of amazing beads she designed from the colors and textures of the painting.  I loved every single thing in this collection and purchased quite a few when they went up for sale.

image

The conundrum quickly shifted to “which beads to design with first?” once I had received them.  I actually have 5 necklaces mocked up on my beading travel desk, but it was hard to choose which to work with first.  I hope to get to the others very soon as these beads are so beautiful – gorgeous colors and interesting textures.   Here’s the necklace that I made first.

image

I paired the Humblebeads bird with a metal clay brass “faux bois” heart pendant I made earlier this spring in my metal clay class and a braided brass oval.  I used the oval as a toggle for the piece and fashioned the bar with a piece of brass wire hammered flat at the ends.  For the body of the necklace, I wire wrapped stone beads and oval links together in a repeating pattern.  I don’t recall what the beads are (probably some kind of jasper), but they are pink/burgundy/grey/black mottled stones that match the bird just perfectly.

image

And here’s a closeup of the bird pendant.  Amazing!

image

Humblebeads also made sets of earring charms and I ordered a pair that complemented the  colors of my bird to use for my earrings.  These are kept fairly simple since the charms themselves are a feast of layered colors and designs.  I added tiny brass hearts from my metal clay set and accented them with a Czech bead.

image

I’m thrilled with this set and never imagined at the start of the month that I would have such a lovely set of artbeads to work with.  And now I’m off to work more on additional pieces!  This is the gift of art – from Picasso 100 years ago, through Heather Powers of Humblebeads, and then to me – we share a conspiracy of color, pattern, inspiration, and creative joy together.

Blessings to you,
Sarah

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gift #1090: A Greener Shade of Green

I’ve always secretly been of the opinion that the Creation narrative in the book of Genesis in English has a slight omission.  I have it on pretty good authority that in the native Hebrew it reads, “And God saw all that He had made and it was very green and very good”.  If I had any doubts about green being God’s favorite color, they were dispelled this weekend.

I spent a few days at Spring Mill State Park where the whole park was saturated in green.  In fact, the very air shimmered green and I’m fairly certain that could we look closely enough, all the molecules were tinted green as well.  Every where you looked, curtains and fountains of green exploded from the earth.  It was like drowning in a sea of color, except that instead of it sucking life from your lungs, it poured life in.

To be in such an environment was so restorative and invigorating.  Despite some rainy weather,  there was still ample opportunity to hit the trails and my mom and I hiked the majority of every day.  I took lots of pictures and tried with all my might to absorb every bit of green that I could into my soul.  We all should be fortified with a bit more green in our hearts.

Blessings to you,

Sarah

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments